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Muscle structure is altered in (spastic) cerebral palsy, which has an effect on function, muscle growth and natural history. Precursors of muscle cells (satellite cells) are also impaired. More knowledge on this might result in targeted treatment.

What is the matter with muscle in cerebral palsy?

Knowledge Hub

Muscle structure is altered in (spastic) cerebral palsy, which has an effect on function, muscle growth and natural history. Precursors of muscle cells (satellite cells) are also impaired. More knowledge on this might result in targeted treatment.

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Synopsis of resource

A video of a lecture given by Professor Lieber at the 29th EACD Annual Meeting in Amsterdam, 18th May 2017. An interesting presentation including detailed scientific data and how these findings are relevant to therapists working with children with cerebral palsy.

Key learning outcomes

What is the matter with muscle in cerebral palsy?

  • Serial sarcomere number is reduced
  • Collagen content is increased, collagen bundle organisation is altered
  • Satellite cell number dramatically reduced and epigenetically modified
  • CP muscles have “trouble growing”
  • Curative therapies hampered by lack of knowledge in several specific areas
Richard Lieber

Author

Professor Richard Lieber PhD is Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President at the Shirley Ryan Ability Lab (formerly the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago). Currently Professor Lieber is focusing on developing state-of-the-art approaches to understanding muscle contractures that result from cerebral palsy, stroke and spinal injury.

Lecture recorded at the 29th EACD Annual Meeting in Amsterdam, 2017.