Knowledge Hub

This material provides an accessible explanation of resilience as a state (rather than a trait) and an approach to supporting the development of resilience in children and families. It would work effectively as a workshop for a wide range of health, education and social care practitioners, and for families.

The Concept of Resilience: Developing Supports to Build Resilience

Knowledge Hub

This material provides an accessible explanation of resilience as a state (rather than a trait) and an approach to supporting the development of resilience in children and families. It would work effectively as a workshop for a wide range of health, education and social care practitioners, and for families.

Synopsis of resource

This material explores the idea of resilience and the constellation of factors that contribute to this concept within the context of childhood disability. The ICF is a dynamic framework that offers a foundation to conceptualize the complex idea of resilience for clinical application. The 4P Framework of Factors also provides a set of interconnected elements that may promote adaptability within an individual. A sample case report is included to help the reader begin thinking about these factors in the context of a framework and its use in clinical practice.

This article also considers ways in which resilience may be measured quantitatively using previously validated measures, or qualitatively assessed using the ICF framework. A selection of additional resources are provided for more information about how resilience is discussed in the context of childhood disability, how it may be placed within the ICF framework, and how it may be measured.

Key learning outcome

  • Resilience is a network of resources, patterns of adaptation and supportive relationships that increase the likelihood that one will be able to withstand stresses during a challenging time
  • Helping children to cope and adapt is as much about changing and adapting the environmental factors around them as it is about changing individuals themselves
  • Increasing one’s Sense of Coherence and Meaning can strengthen their ability to be resilient
  • The ICF can be used to frame the concept of resilience as a force with many interconnected elements that promote adaptability within an individual
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Authors

Julia ten Hove, MSc., Peter Rosenbaum, MD, FRCP(C), DSc (HC)

Julia completed her Masters in Anatomical Sciences at Queen’s University in 2019 after studying Life Sciences at McMaster University. Her research in resilience started as an Honors Thesis project at McMaster, working with the CanChild Foundation to conceptualize the idea of resilience within the ICF framework. Julia’s Master’s degree fostered her passion for teaching and meaningful knowledge translation. She currently works as a research associate at Kingston Health Sciences Centre, studying influential factors for Quality of Life in cancer patients, and examining stress and resilience in healthcare workers.